{ Banner }

Tax Blawg

Tax Talk for Tax Pros

Introduction

Welcome to TaxBlawg, a resource from Chamberlain Hrdlicka for news and analysis of current legal issues facing tax practitioners. Although blawg.com identifies nearly 1,400 active “blawgs,” including 20+ blawgs related to taxation and estate planning, the needs of tax professionals have received surprisingly little attention.

The Wall Street Journal's Tax Blog gives “tips and advice for filers,” and Paul Caron’s legendary TaxProf Blog is an excellent clearinghouse for academic and policy-oriented news. Yet, tax practitioners still lack a dedicated resource to call their own. For those intrepid souls, we offer TaxBlawg, a forum of tax talk for tax pros.

Popular Topics

Chamberlain Hrdlicka Blawgs

Business and International Tax Developments Blawg

Employee Benefits Blog

Labor & Employment Blog

Maritime Blog

SALT Blawg

Tax Blawg

Posts tagged IRS.

The IRS employs many lawyers and employees of the IRS Office of Chief Counsel are its principal legal staff who number 1560, of whom about 550 work in the IRS National Office in Washington, while the balance work in offices around the country.  They provide legal advice to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue and the local IRS offices, and they act as the lawyer for the Commissioner of Internal Revenue in all Tax Court cases.  In addition, some are specially designated to assist United States Attorneys in bankruptcy, summons enforcement and other civil cases.

In 1998, a Chief Counsel’s ...

Previous Blawg articles have cautioned my readers about the problems they can face if they do not take care of their Federal employment taxes, ranging from collection action against their business, to the trust fund recovery penalty being asserted against individuals determined to be “responsible officers.”  Since Federal agencies are also required to pay employment taxes for their employees, it is only fair to wonder if the IRS is dealing as harshly with them.  The answer warrants a letter to your Congressman.

On September 5, 2012, the Treasury Inspector General For ...

Obviously, there will be “nothing” to do unless the business owes taxes or has not filed all its tax returns.  These comments are prompted by the fact is that the IRS has just issued a Manual Administration Supplement No. 855 to instruct its employees about how to proceed in the case of insolvency proceedings.

If the company files bankruptcy, the IRS will file a Proof of Claim and, depending upon the nature of its claim—is a Federal Tax Lien filed?are the taxes assessed?—it will proceed to pursue its rights based on its priority relative to other creditors.  If the proceeding is ...

Recently, the IRS issued "Tax Tip 2012-39" regarding important issues concerning mortgage debt forgiveness.  While anyone capable of reading this Blawg is capable of pulling that up from the IRS website and reading it, no action should be undertaken without making sure your tax professional has covered the positives and negatives of doing so.

Right now, a lot of people are "under water" on their home mortgage, and faced with possible foreclosure, short sale, or other transactions in which their mortgage debt is partly or entirely "forgiven" during this tax year.  There are several ...

In February, the IRS published its annual "Dirty Dozen" listing of tax scams to caution taxpayers about problems they may face in this filing season.  They range from self-inflicted—too good to be true—to situations where third parties prey upon the unsuspecting.

Several are fairly common and familiar, ranging from reporting income that was not earned in order to maximize refundable credit, claiming excessive fuel tax credits, or simply claiming deductions one did not incur.  So are the time-worn tax protester arguments that have been thrown out by the courts.  There are ...

During a course that I taught about tax treaties at last week’s TEI Houston Tax School, one audience member asked whether the exchange-of-information provisions of U.S. tax treaties apply not only to the federal government but also to state and local governments.   I had to confess that I did not know the answer of the top of my head.  However, I took a quick look at the question later in the week.

By way of background, in each income tax treaty with foreign jurisdictions, the United States negotiates an “exchange of information and administrative assistance” provision.  This ...

It is not uncommon for sought-after job seekers to receive what appears to be an offer that is too good to be true:  in addition to a good compensation and benefits package, the employer proposes to make a loan to the applicant, and to forgive the entire amount if the person stays employed for a particular term—such as five years.  Sometimes the game plan is not in writing, and is left to “wink wink, nudge nudge” in terms of the likelihood that the loan will be forgiven if the person stays employed that length of time.

These arrangements are not in any way “illegal,” but as Robert and ...

Categories: Tax Procedure

The difference between what taxpayers should pay and what they actually pay the IRS is called the “tax gap.”  A significant portion of the tax gap is attributable to non-compliance with employment tax laws, including worker misclassification.  The IRS is currently conducting a three-year research project, which entails an additional 6,000 random employment tax audits.  This research will inevitably lead to the conclusion that worker misclassification is rampant and depriving the federal government of billions of dollars in tax revenues each year.  Therefore, the IRS likely ...

Nearly all taxpayers will face penalties by the IRS at some point, regardless of their sophistication level and size.  Accordingly, tax practitioners, even those who claim not to get involved in traditional "collection" activities, must understand key aspects of abatement and collection procedures in order to effectively advise their clients.  This is particularly true given that the IRS persists in taking extreme positions in the Tax Court, such as the always-say-never approach, that are contrary to the majority of existing legal authorities.  A recent example is Custom Stairs & ...

Fox Business invited me to appear yesterday on “After The Bell” with Liz Claman and David Asman to discuss (i) the IRS reopening the disclosure initiative for offshore bank accounts and (ii) the ongoing debate about whether Congress should implement a corporate repatriation holiday.  A link to the video is below the fold.

See the video at Fox Business.

The reopening of the 2011 OVDI is good news for taxpayers.  While the initiative presently has no deadline by which taxpayers must come forward, the IRS can change the terms of the initiative at any time.  If the government experiences ...